BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

Materials
  • - Fabric
  • - Lining
  • - Thread
  • - Velcro Loop Tape
  • - Cord
  • - Rods
  • - Bottom Bar
  • - Rings
  • Tools
  • - Sewing Machine
  • - Tape Measure
  • - Needles
  • - Scissors
  • - Set Square
  • - Straight Edge
  • - Invisible Marker
  • Options
  • - Invisible Marker
  • - Velcro Hook Tape
  • - Screw Eyes
  • - Acorn
  • - Cleat Hook
  • - Cord
  • - Staple Gun
  • or
  • - Headrail Kit
  • - Hacksaw
  • Watch the videos for full step by step tution of the instructions and expert tips from the workshop

    Video User Comments

    I love your videos they have given me the confidence to make my own curtains and blinds....Julie

    Your videos are so good, thank you…..Alex

    Once again, I should say that I think the video tutorials are extremely well done. Although I've been sewing for years I've learnt lots of techniques that are new to me and that give a much more professional finish........Heather

    Thank you for such brilliant tutorials and videos....... ....Barbara

    I have absolutely loved your videos for curtain making, I have learnt so much from you….Charlotte

    Step 8: Apply Heading & Stab Stitch
    Printable Worksheet
    Printable Worksheet

    FORM THE HEADING

    • Remove the pins.
    • Lay the blind down fabric facing upwards and smooth out.
    • Measure up from the bottom of the blind the “finished blind length”, marking each side and at points across the blind. Draw a line across the points with the vanishing marker to mark the top of the blind.
    • Turn the blind back over, again fold the lining back at the top in line with the end of the slip stitching and pin it back.
    • Turn the blind over facing fabric side up
    • Lay loop fastening tape (velcro) horizontally across the blind just ABOVE the drawn line.
    • Machine stitch the loop fastening tape to the blind.
    • Turn the blind over right side down.
    • Unpin the lining and trim it to 0.5cm from the top of the blind. (bottom line of velcro stitching)
    • Trim the excess fabric above the velcro to leave a 1.5cm flap above the velcro. (this excess fabric will be hidden behind the loop tape when the bottom of the tape is stitched to the blind later)
    This video shows you
    • Where and why we use tacking stitches at this stage.
    • How to measure the length of the blind.
    • How we pin the lining back.
    • How to sew the velcro to the blind.
    • How to trim excess lining away.
    • How to trim excess fabric away.

    MARK STAB STITCHES & FINISH HEADING

    • With the blind laying fabric face down, smooth the lining and mark the positions to attach the rings. Rings should be 10cm from the sides of the blind and evenly across at 30 to 40cm intervals.

      (If you are using a blind kit make the number of rings across the same as the number of cord drops in the kit. - Space the rings accordingly)

    • Mark and pin the positions of all your stab stitches. which will be at each end of the rod pocket, at each ring position and half way between each ring.
    • Trim away any excess velcro.
    • Fold the top of the blind over along the marked line so the velcro loop fastening is now on the back of the blind. Pin into position. (tucking the excess fabric flap under)
    • Ladder stitch the end closed.
    • Slip stitch the bottom of the loop tape to the back of the blind to hold in place.
    • Ladder stitch the far end closed.

    This video shows you
    • How and where to mark the stab stitches.
    • How to pin the blind out.
    • How to trim the excess velcro.
    • How to fold and pin the heading.
    • How to tidy the heading ends.
    • How to ladder stitch the ends closed.
    • How to slip stitch the heading

    STAB STITCH

    Now sew in all your stab stitches.

    This video shows you
    • What colour thread to use.
    • Why we pin the stab stitches.
    • How to stab stitch.
    • How small your stab stitches should be. (demonstration in red thread)
    • How to start and finish the stitch.

    Extra Help & Comments

    Sew Helpful
    Post your questions and comments here, we will reply so everyone can see the answer. 
    Elizabeth
    Thank you for detailed instructions. Please can you explain stab stitch? Thank you.
    Sew Helpful
    We have a video coming explaining stab stitch. Please follow us on Facebook or twitter to be notified when it is available.
    Lynne
    Ive been following your instructions -blind looking great so far!
    Please can you tell me do the stab stitches go through both the lining and the fabric ?
    Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    Yes they do to hold the blind together. The video fully explains and demonstrates how to stab stitch the blind.
    janice baker
    I have never seen or used velcro loop fastening, so could you please advise me what width I should buy,
    Blind is 140cmx140cm Do I buy hook and loop fastening, excuse my ignorance. Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    The size we use in the videos is about 22mm wide. You will need  soft sew on loop for the blind. But will only need to buy the sticky hook if you are making a wooden batten, as a mechanism will already have the hook tape on it. 
    Sheelagh
    I am using your very helpful instructions to make three Roman blinds for a bay window. I would ask you to clarify 'stab stiches' I assume this attaches the blind material to the lining at the rod pockets and goes through all layers. I just want to check that I have it right! Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    Yes the stab stitch goes all the way through to the face fabric but you try to make it show as little as possible. The video shows you in detail how to stitch it and how little of the stitch you want to show.
    Sarah Davies
    I have bought your video and found it great for making my first blind, I couldn't do your rod pickets as I had thermal lining so made my own little pockets out of a different lining and stitched them on, I didn't get them quite as straight as I wanted to and my top rod pocket is about 5ml wider than the rest, I have tried to correct it as best as possible. When I come to stitch on my rings should I put them wher the rod pocket should be on the top rod pocket or keep it 5ml out ? Also is 3 strings ok for a 117cm width blind ?
    Sew Helpful
    At the moment there are instructions written in red in the tutorial that tell you how to make the blind with rod pocket tape rather than traditional integral pockets. (They drop down if you click on them).

    You attach the tape with one line of stitching NOT 2  lines, as the blind is pulled up on the stitch line of the pocket. With rod pocket tape you would usually have canvas loops in it for attaching breakout rings or threading the cord. With your homemade tape attach the rings/breakouts as we do in the tutorial.

    As for things being 5mm out and adjusting the ring position, we would remake to make sure it is not 5mm out and everything is consistent rather than start moving things around. ( so have no experience of that to offer- but it sounds like it might work). 

    As as for the number of cords, this is covered in STEP 8 (stab stitching & attaching rings). We recommend the number of rings/cords there and their spacing. If you are using a Blind kit mechanism, use the number of cords provided and space accordingly (as in many countries now they have breakouts and each cord will only be able to pull so much weight before breaking away.)
    Dee
    Just spent a day on this method! As a very experienced seamstress this is too complicated for a weekend sewer.
    Wouldn't use this method again.
    Sew Helpful
    Hi Dee

    This tutorial is not trying to show you a quick and easy way to knock up a roman blind. It shows you how to make it to the standard it would be made if you were paying for it. That said we have incorporated some instructions on how to use rod pocket tape to save having to sew rings on the back as many people like to use the tape, even though that is not how we make lined blinds for customers.

    The written instructions are supplemented by "Extra help" at the bottom of the page where you can ask us a question about the tuorial instructions and we will post an answer. Also the videos show every step in great detail. 

    Could you expand on what you found too complicated as the only other feedback we've had has been how clear the instructions are and easy to follow. Much of that feedback comes from complete beginners making blinds for the first time. As "a very experienced seamstress" we are wondering which areas of the instructions and method you thought were not suitable for a beginner or a weekend sewer.

    Annette
    Hi....2 queries please!
    1. I'm assuming the Velcro tape is machined onto face fabric only, and not thru to lining?
    2. My blind is 57cm wide....not sure whether to do 2 or 3 cord drops?

    Loving the instructions, many thanks!
    Sew Helpful
    You could probably get away with 2 cord drops on a traditional blind, but if you have a chain headrail go for the number of drops it was supplied with as it will probably have breakouts and each cord will only be able to take so much weight.

    All the stitching and construction is shown in great detail in the videos.
    Angela
    When slip stitching the heading to the blind, should the stiches go all the way through to the front of the fabric or just stitched to the lining?
    Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    Full details of the construction method and stitches are shown in detail in the videos.
    Marianne
    I am now ready to put in stab stitches and rings. The blind is 114 cm wide. If I follow your instructions I will have a ring at 10cm from edge, either side, then 2 more in between and 31.3cm apart. That means I will end up with 4 strings to hold the blind up. Is that ok or a bit excessive? Thanks for your help
    Sew Helpful
    That is the number we recommend and would use, especially if you have break outs that can only take so much tension on each cord. Most 120cm blind kits come with 4 cords. (with a mechanism we would use the number of cords supplied with it.)

    Of course you can make it with less if you like, but  the blinds are stiffer to pull up if you put too much weight on a cord. It will depend on the weight of your fabric/blind friction of the cords/eyelets you use etc.
    Kathy King
    Hi -

    when you attach the rings do you attach just to the rod pocket? or how do you do this? I understand the stab stitches inbetween the rings but confused as to how to attach rings and stabstitch at same time (with rod pocket in the way)
    Sew Helpful
    You Stab stitch first, insert the rods then sew the rings onto the rod pockets after. All the stitches are demonstrated in detail in the videos.
    Julia Savory
    As a more or less complete beginner, I find these instructions informative, clear and easy to follow. The only thing I wish you'd show is how you handle blinds that are too big for your table. I'm using the floor but finding it all very painful on my back!
    Sew Helpful
    In the early days we bought a board and covered it with lining and put it on top of the dining room table to give us enough surface to work with at a more comfortable height. (I appreciate that is not possible for everyone)
    Jayne
    Thank you for your invaluable, detailed tutorial. I have used rod pocket tape so do I lift the tape up to put my stab stitches underneath the tape or do I put the stab stitches above the tape please?
    Sew Helpful
    We stitch through the tape on the stitch line you attached the rod pocket to the lining. This is the point the cords will be pulling on the blind as it is pulled up.
    Lesley
    What measurements between rods on a54in drop Roman blind
    Sew Helpful
    You need to read STEP 2 that explains how to calculate the blind's dimensions and layout.
    Julie Horton
    I have used black out lining and have found that where you connect the lining and material together, it shows a tiny bead of light through when the blind is hung and it is no longer dark outside. How can you stop this?
    Sew Helpful
    This Tutorial is for a cotton lined blind. We make our blackout blinds in a similar way to the interlined blind tutorial. Sandwiching a layer of blackout between the lining and the fabric. That avoids the lines of pin holes where the rod pockets are sewn on/in.

    You still have pinpricks of light where the blind is stab stitched though.   
    Linda
    Will i get the best by stab stitching with my material flat on the table or hanging the material of a frame
    Sew Helpful
    We stab stitch on the table, all details are in the videos.
    Rachel
    Great tutorials - thanks. When slip stitching the heading, or you never picking up the face fabric? I think I've gone this a few times & it leave an un-smooth looking top the the blind on the face fabric?

    2nd question... If blind is 2.5m wide... Would you machine heading instead of folding over & slip stitching as above?

    Thanks

    Eli
    Hi,

    Thank you for your great tutorials and instructions. Being far from an expert seamstress I found them most helpful.

    My question is the following: I made a blind lined with blackout fabric. I realise now that you recommend using the interlined method for blackout blinds. How can I remedy the fact that my blind does not fully darken my daughter's bedroom? Shall I undo the blind and sandwich in it an additional layer of lining?

    Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    You have to get the blackout to the edge of the blind which will require a remake. 2 layers of blackout may make it a bit thick, so it would be better to remake the lining in cotton lining as well.. You will always get light around the edge of the blind though anyway, so is it worth it?

    We will be making a blackout blind tutorial in due course. 
    Ruth Walton
    Hi
    I have nearly finished making my lined blind. I have used rod pocket tape but this is only stitched on to the lining. Should this row of stitching holding it on go right through to the front fabric? The kit has little clips for the cord so these don't even go trhough any fabrice.

    Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    With our method we dont stitch through to the face fabric with the rod pockets. We stab stitch the layers together, which is the last job on this page of the tutorial.
    Sheridan Colson
    Hi there,

    If I have a blind that is 2m 10cm can I still use a batten? I know it would be better to use a track but can't afford it. It will have seven strings.
    Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    We have made blinds that wide with battens in the past and they have worked. The bigeer they get (heavier with more strings) the harder they are to pull up though. It will really depend how long and heavy your blind is.

    Nowadays we would use a mechanism and expect it to be geared at that size to cope with the weight. We also now use mechanism systems for all roman blinds  in the work shop as they are the easiest way to ensure that our blinds comply with child safety regulations.
    Sheridan
    Its only 94cm long so do you think that will be okay?
    Sew Helpful
    Should work, but we can't give a definate answer as it will depend on the weight and how smoothly your cords pull.
    Sheridan
    Great thanks
    Sian McDermott
    Hi - love your videos. Just wanted to let you know that the video about placing stab stitches is missing
    Sew Helpful
    It is showing playing on the low res link and on the webpage, also on the ipad and iphone version. What are you viewing on?
    Amanda
    Hi
    I have been following your videos making a lined blind with rod pockets. I have purchased a metal mechanism rail with which has 5 cord drops. My blind is 128cm long, spacing out the rings would make stab stitches req for rings at 10, 37, 64, 91 and 118 cm. This leaves 27cm gaps, would you add stab stitches in between - at 13.5 cm intervals which is less than you minimum, but if I don't the gaps will be greater than your maximum gap.
    Thanks for any advice you can give me.
    Sew Helpful
    Yes always stab stitch more rather than less, we would stab stitch inbetween the rings.
    Helen
    Hello. Many thanks for the videos, they are a great help.
    I have used blackout lining, following the instructions in the extra help section of step 6. However, when I come to fold the lining back as in the video, my lining is underneath the double 2cm side seam of the face fabric and not on top, so I can't fold it back. Should I have finished the slipstictching more than 1cm short of the mark for the top of the blind?
    Sew Helpful
    You'll need to unpick at the top a bit to fold back.
    Sharon
    Hi
    I am using rod pocket tape, could you tell me do I stab stitch above, below or underneath the rod pocket tape? Also should I stab stitch every 10cm across as I don't need to use rings?
    Finally, should I stab stitch along the fold line? Great videos and instructions, blind looking good so far. Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    Stab stitch on the stitch line in the places specified in the instructions. As you are not seeing on rings, stab stitch at the points where there would have been rings.
    Sophia Clarke
    I paid for the 28 days access yesterday, joined ok then, but getting access denied today on copying and pasting my code...please help.....
    Sew Helpful
    Please see your email
    Sheila
    Hi
    Great tutorial! Found it most helpful as I have never made a roman blind before. Just one query, do I I need to stab stitch underneath the heading.?
    Many thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    No
    Joanna
    Hello......I have made many roman blinds and like using your instructions and calculators.
    One problem I always seem to have is that the velcro always seems to pull the top of the blind in so that the blind ends up a few mm narrowerat the top....any ideas?
    Sew Helpful
    Walking foot on the machine will help with that.
    Joanna
    Hello.many thanks for above advice. Love the videos, however is there any chance you could have a written download available with them so that once you've purchased and watched you have something you can print off and refer to. Just an idea.
    Sew Helpful
    We will look into making PDFs (will take a while)
    Joanna
    Thanks for tip of walking foot, hunted mine out having never used it and it's awesome, also for sewing rod pockets, used to find these stretched out of shape before. Thanks so much!
    Susan
    Hi there :) I'm in the process of following the video tutorials and so far it's looking really good. I'm a bit confused though now I've reached the bit where we're trimming the top. On the worksheet I entered 89cms as my finished length. This includes a 6cm headrail allowance. I noticed on the worksheet it says to allow 5cm Heading allowance but I can't see any mention of this in the tutorials. So I've been measuring everything length wise at 103cm (89 plus 9 bottom hem allowance plus 5 heading allowance. In this video tutorial it says to measure and cut the finished length which means that the pattern no longer starts in the right place as it should start 5cms higher. I'm aware i've probably got mixed up at some point and it's fine with this one as it's outside the recess but i'd really like to understand where the heading allowance is used so I don't get mixed up next time. Is it something to do with trimming allowance? And I guess at the point where you cut the length of fabric I should have measured the finished length rather than the finished length plus heading allowance. Thank you :)
    Susan
    Don't worry about answering! I answered my own question by sewing on the velcro then cutting 1.5cm above it - heading allowance!!!! SO relieved it's clear now. I thought I might have done the inital measurements wrong but what I actually did wrong was include the heading allowance when I measured and cut the fabric length. Phew!
    Sew Helpful
    Glad you have worked it out, When reading through your question you seemed to be mixing up the terms heading allowance (extra fabric at top use to form the heading) and headrail allowance (a section of the length of the blind at the top we need when calculating the fold positions)
    Roseanne
    Thank you for your brilliant tutorials- I'm now on my 3rd blind and your instructions are excellent. I have a problem with my latest blind - the folds hang slightly to the left when the blind is raised. I would appreciate any suggestion to rectify this.thank you.
    Sew Helpful
    Is the cord on that side the correct length it sounds slightly too long. Do you have a toggle end so you can adjust it.

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