BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

Materials
  • - Fabric
  • - Lining
  • - Thread
  • - Velcro Loop Tape
  • - Cord
  • - Rods
  • - Bottom Bar
  • - Rings
  • Tools
  • - Sewing Machine
  • - Tape Measure
  • - Needles
  • - Scissors
  • - Set Square
  • - Straight Edge
  • - Invisible Marker
  • Options
  • - Invisible Marker
  • - Velcro Hook Tape
  • - Screw Eyes
  • - Acorn
  • - Cleat Hook
  • - Cord
  • - Staple Gun
  • or
  • - Headrail Kit
  • - Hacksaw
  • Watch the videos for full step by step tution of the instructions and expert tips from the workshop

    Video User Comments

    I love your videos they have given me the confidence to make my own curtains and blinds....Julie

    Your videos are so good, thank you…..Alex

    Once again, I should say that I think the video tutorials are extremely well done. Although I've been sewing for years I've learnt lots of techniques that are new to me and that give a much more professional finish........Heather

    Thank you for such brilliant tutorials and videos....... ....Barbara

    I have absolutely loved your videos for curtain making, I have learnt so much from you….Charlotte

    Step 6: Make Up Face Fabric
    Printable Worksheet
    Printable Worksheet

    If you are using more than one width, join the fabric with a plain seam or seams. Note a much better finish is achieved by joining fabric to either side of a full central panel, making sure the seams are the same distance from each edge so the panels are symmetrical and any pattern remains central.

    See our BASICS Tutorial - How to join plain fabric

    See our BASICS Tutorial - How to join patterned fabric

    PLAIN and PATTERNED FABRIC are treated differently at this stage WARNING *

    PLAIN FABRIC

    • Cut the plain fabric to the length of the FABRIC CUT DROP calculated in step 3.

      ie: Cut Length = Finished Blind Length + 5cm Heading Allowance + 9cm Hem Allowance

      Note we add a 5cm trimming allowance to the initial cut lengths to allow for trimming them square.

    • Check the bottom of the panel is straight and at a true right angle, if not trim.
    • Cut the fabric panel to the FABRIC CUT WIDTH in Step 3 (finished blind width + 10cm).
    This video shows you
    • How to cut the fabric straight.
    • How to cut the fabric square.
    • Why we mark the fabric with a pin in the bottom right side.

    PATTERNED FABRIC

    First work out where you want the pattern to be on the finished blind.

    • Make sure the pattern is central on the blind
    • With a stripe it is important to have an equal amount of stripe on each side of the blind for it to look right.
    • Cut your fabric panel to the FABRIC CUT WIDTH in Step 3 (finished blind width + 10cm).
    • Remember to keep your pattern central in the correct postion by removing fabric from each side.
    • Find the point where you want the pattern to start at the top of the blind
    • Measure up from that "top of blind point" the heading allowance (5cm). This is the position to start measuring your cut drop from.
    • Now measure down the FABRIC CUT DROP calculated in step 3 and cut.
    • ie: Cut Length = Finished Blind Length + 5cm Heading Allowance + 9cm Hem Allowance

    • Check the bottom of the panel is straight and at a true right angle, if not trim.
    This video shows you
    • How place the pattern on the fabric.
    • How to cut the fabric sides and pattern straight.
    • How to cut the fabric square.
    • Why we mark the fabric with a pin at the bottom.

    PLAIN and PATTERNED FABRIC are now treated the same.

    TURN IN SIDES & HEM

    • Place the fabric panel right side up and mark the 5cm side allowances with dashes of vanishing marker pen (or pins).
    • Turn the fabric over right side down and fold in the side allowances. Checking the width is the finished width of the blind all the way up and the bottom is straight and at a true right angle.
    • Now mark the 9cm double hem allowance with two lines of vanishing marker pen (or pins). The first line 4cm up from the bottom and the second line a further 5 cm up.
    • Fold up the double hem twice along the two lines marked. Check the blind is square.
    • You are now ready to join your fabric and lining.
    This video shows you
    • How to mark, fold and press the side turns.
    • How to measure, pin, fold and press the hem.

    Extra Help & Comments

    Sew Helpful
    Post your questions and comments here, we will reply so everyone can see the answer.
    Patricia Harrow
    If I interline my blinds, at which width will it be necessary to attach the interlining to the main fabric to prevent it ballooning? Could this be done by blind hem with machine?
    Thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    Hi Patricia

    There is a full written tutorial on our website on how to make an interlined Roman Blind here bit.ly/INTblind

    It is a different make up process to the lined blind with mitred corners. All is explained in the written tutorial. The stab stitching at a later stage holds the interlining in place.
    Alison
    Your instructions are brilliant but I have a problem!My check patterned material has a warp to the weave. ie I have cut and measured using lines of the checks so pattern looks straight BUT I find now I do not have right angles in corners. I can either have top and bottom pattern in alignment (horiozntal lines) with sides of blind compensating for warp, or side/vertical) pattern parallel and top/bottom squiffy! what do you suggest? I have 3 to make (2 next to each other 46 x 85cm and 3rd 119 x 107cm)all in recess of windows so need to fit properly. Help!
    Sew Helpful
    We have mentioned this before in an answer. We would always avoid using a check pattern for a blind for this very reason. However as you have the fabric already all we can suggest is that you go for which way you think looks best and decide now before you spend a lot of time making the blinds up whether you will be happy enough with them when you are finished. 

    If it is really bad sometimes the best option is to save the check fabric for another project and select a more suitable fabric . 

    With Blinds stripes work well, checks do not. 

    Mumtaz Din
    Hi I purchased to view the videos for 7 days but received no email from you & I cant watch the videos. I have made payment from the following paypal xxxxxxxx
    Please could you check & reply as soon as possible. Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    Hi

    First check your Junk folder in your email account as sometimes people find the email has gone there.
    The logs show you have viewed some videos so I hope you have got things sorted already.

    If you are still having problems please email us directly at sales@sew-helpful.com or use the contact form on the website so we can help you directly rather than leave answers here in the comments section.

     
    Margy Craig
    Off topic, but I really love this green/grey patterned material you have used on this video. Can you tell me the name of it and the supplier info, if possible please. thank you so much and sorry for hijacking this video thread.
    Sew Helpful
    Hi Its called Eden Charteuse by Romo Black Edition.  RRP £75pm if you call Dolman and Taylor on 01608495182 and tell them you use Sew Helpful they will do you a deal.
    Sue Bauer
    I am making a Roman Blind with symmetrical circles. Should I ensure that I have a full circle at the top of the blind or the bottom. The top will obviously be on show all the time whereas the bottom will only show when it's fully down. What is the correct method? Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    There is no correct method it always comes down to a design decision. We do exactly as you say though when making a blind. We place the pattern in the best position at the top of a blind as it will be on show all the time.

    Blind with Circles
    Anna
    Hi,
    I used your tutorials to learn how to make an interlined roman blind and your videos were great and so helpful.
    I am about to start a blind which is 160cm wide and I wondered if you know where I can buy extra wide interlining (I used Sarille for the last one) or if not, please can you tell me how to join interlining?
    Many thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    No i'm afraid all the linings we use only come in standard widths. You can always use the lining/interlining sideways in wide blinds to avoid joins if the drop of the blind allows.
    JulIe
    Hi, I am making 4 blinds for a large square bay window. The front window is made up of 4 sections and is 286cms wide by 170 drop. The sides are 90cms wide x 170 drop. I thought about making 2 separate blinds for the front 143cms each. Unfortunately this will mean attaching a small amount of fabric to each blind. I notice that you suggest attaching a strip either side of the blind to balance it, but this doesn't seem logical in my situation. I had thought about using the surplus cut off from the return windows and attaching this to the outer edge of the two windows which would mean the two blinds at the front would be balanced overall. It would also mean I could save on extra widths of fabric. Do you think what I suggest is ok? Or do you feel there is a better alternative. I would prefer not to have 4 blinds across the front as I don't feel this will look as nice as just 2.
    I think I have read that the lining should be joined horizontally, not vertically - is this correct?
    Wait to hear from you. Many thanks.
    This website is so helpful.
    Sew Helpful
    You can make the blinds with the join in the fabric however you like, it will not affect how they work. But as we say in the tutorial if you need more than one panel, we always make a balanced blind with a centre panel and equal fabric either side. (we just think it looks better made). With such a narrow strip on either side if you are using plain fabric you can always make the centre panel slightly narrower and the edge strips wider if they really are too narrow.

    The lining is joined the same way as the fabric. If you have a wide blind with a short drop (not in this case) you can use the lining sideways to avoid having to make any joins. The other thing that can be a pain with joined lining is the rods getting stuck when you pass them through the lining joins in the rod pockets. You dont have this problem if you use rod pocket tape.

    We have 3 blinds going through the workshop at the moment all 143cm wide each with a 127 centre panel and strips either side of 8cm.

    143cm blind

    samantha
    Hi, this tutorial is great and I am going to buy the videos soon as I have all the material ready. I have a question: I can't see anywhere on this tutorial how to cut "on grain" the fabric. Cutting on grain pulling the thread is one of the many ways, I tried and sometimes it's very difficult (thread can break easily so I take forever to cut it). DO you have any tricks to suggest? And also: I don;t have a huge table where to cut the fabric: having a big working space does the difference or, with some tricks, it's possible to do it on a regular table (100 x 140). thank you
    Sew Helpful
    All the techniques we use for measuring, cutting, and getting the blind square are shown in the videos. We obviously have a large table in the workroom with long Tbars,  but in the videos we take into account most people will have to work on a smaller table at home or on the floor. So we don't just use our big perfectly square table and Tbar to get it staright, we show you how to do it with the tools you will have.
    Sarah
    Hi, I am finding your website very useful thanks. I'm not sure whether you have covered this already. But I am about to start cutting my fabric and lining for 2m wide x 1.25m window. I have black out lining, and previously you mentioned about making sure the lining goes to the edges, to ensure that it blacks out the whole window. Can you offer me some advise on how to do this, and how to attach the lining to the main fabric? as keen not to make a mistake. Also I understand that you recommend using rod pocket tape as the lining is quite heavy, is that correct?
    Sew Helpful
    On a blackout lined blind we make and use rod pocket tape. We will be making a tutorial for a blackout blind but it is not ready yet.

    Here is that info on how to get the blackout lining to the edge of the blind. (note with a blackout roman blind you will have pinpricks of light in the blackout on the stab stitches)

    1. Cut your blackout lining so it is 0.5cm  narrower than the finished width of the blind (so it is not too tight inside the blind fabric).
    2. Cut the blackout lining so you only have 5cm for the hem not 9cm as with the fabric( the blackout lining only folds up on the first fold- to reduce bulk in the hem.)
    3. Cut you fabric panel 8cm wider than the finished width of the blind so you can make a double 2cm side turn on each side of the blind to overlap the blackout lining panel.

    4. Sew the rod pocket tape to the blackout lining taking it to 2cm from each side.

    5. Fold and finger press your hems and 4cm side turns on the face fabric.

    6. Insert and position the blackout lining.

    7. Fold your 4cm side turns over again to make double 2cm side turns and then slip stitch the side turn to the blackout lining.


     
     

    Fabric 4cm longer- blackout lining only in first turn of hem.



    4cm side turn, turned again to make double 2cm side turns.



    Rod pockets to 2cm of lining edge, we will trim and tidy them later





    Slip stitch side turn to blackout lining 



    Annette
    Hi
    My fabric is a geometric pattern and if I cut according to the pattern on all 4 sides, the panel is not square, it hangs slightly skewed to one side - by about 1 cm from top to bottom.
    As the top is always on show, is it then best to correct the 2 long side edges so it hangs true, and hope the eye does not notice the difference in pattern down the side edges? Thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    It is always a real pain when patterns are not straight, especially when making a blind when you will notice the difference. Have you tried "moving" the fabric so that is straightens up a bit - this is sometimes possible with certain fabrics with a lot of give in them. If there is no give in it, you are going to have to cut the fabric with true right angles accepting the skew in the pattern, there is no other way round it with a blind as it has to be straight. Good luck!!
    Annette
    Wow that's a great tip...thank you!
    Have managed to 'move' it so it's now hanging straight - brilliant!
    Sheridan
    Hi there, I have some beautiful fabric that is heavily patterned and although by sight it looks like the pattern has obvious lines where I could end the blind, when I use the ruler the ends of each set of patterns isn't straight at all. For example part of the pattern is a set of birds so if I set the ruler at the bottom of these it eventually cuts through the third or fourth set of birds horizontally. Any ideas for this? The sides aren't such a problem, well, lets see once I've done the pattern matching!! It's 206cm wide!
    Sew Helpful
    Some fabrics have a lot of give in them, you are going to have to lay it out and try to manipulate it. 
    Morag
    Hello

    Love the tutorial – so clear and easy to follow!

    I am planning to put a 5cm contrasting linen border on the sides and bottom of my linen roman blind. Can you please give me some advice on the best way to do this?

    Very grateful for any pointers you can give me!

    Thanks in advance!
    Sew Helpful
    You will need to make your fabric panel with the borders joined first, leaving enough fabric for the side turns, heading and hem. Join the fabrics with a 1.5 to 2cm seam pressed flat.

    The easy way is to join the bottom panel first then, cut down and then add the sides. The other more difficult way involves mitring the corners where the borders meet. The description of how to do that is a bit too invloved to write here.
    Sheila
    These are great details, not complicated at all.that is all anyone needs . Just basic information.hooray
    Jolanta
    Hi!
    If fabric for the roman blind is heavy already, will it be better to make it with blackoutlining or still okay to make it with thick lining( interlining tipe ?
    I wander what weight of the blind fitting can hold by velcro?
    Is there exist some limitaitions?
    Thanms a lot in advance!
    Sew Helpful
    There are many variables and ultimatley there is a limit to the weight that the velcro can hold though it usually holds pretty well. It will mainly depend on how long your blind is. We cant give you a figure I'm afraid.
    Lyn
    I am using a blackout lining and tape for my battens. Will it make for a stronger blind if I sew through the lining and the front fabric when I attach my tape, rather than just attaching it to the lining?
    Thanks for a great tutorial, this is my first attempt but really enjoying the challenge.
    Sew Helpful
    Thats not how we make them as we don't think they look as good. If you stab stitch properly and in the right places your blind should easily be strong enough.

    Look at our BLOG - How we dont make our blinds- Article to see what happenes if you sew through to the front and dont get dead straight lines.

     
    Jane
    My fabric does not have a straight selvedge, on either side, to measure in from for my first straight edge - how do I get around this please?

    Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    If you are following the video for a plain fabric, if the selvedge is not straight, measure in at the top and bottom and join the points with a straight line.
    Margie
    I'm following the instructions for black out blinds that you kindly posted above (with the diagrams). I've sewn rod pockets to 2 cm of the lining edge. Do I then cut and insert rods 1 cm less in length than this and fold over any excess rod pocket material? This means that the rods are about 2 cm shorter on each side than the width of the blind is this correct?

    Many thanks

    Margie
    Sew Helpful
    The information is not a full set of instructions on how to make blackout blinds. It is the content of an email we sent to an experienced sewer who was asking about making blackout blinds. The limited info we have posted was to be combined with the lined roman blind tutorial. After multiple requests for the contents of that email (as we said we had sent it in the comments section) we posted it as so many people were asking for it.

    We are in the process of writing a stand alone Blackout Roman blind tutorial and shooting videos for it. It will be slightly different from the iinfo here as we have developed our method further to reduce pinpricks of lighr through the blackout where it is stitched.

    The rods will be 0.5 to 1cm shorter than the finished rod pocket. We would stitch the tape closed 2cm in from the edge of the bllind and tidy the ends. We will be making videos to show how we do this in due course.
    Linda McCarthy
    I have a roman blind which is 162cm finished and my fabric is 150cm wide. How do I balance the drops out so I have 2 on each side to make it look balanced? Do I make the middle 137cm but that still doesn't give me much on each side. Any ideas would be appreciated as I want it to look right.
    Sew Helpful
    I assume you have plain fabric. We usually go for about 10 to 12cm strips each side. We lay it out and see what the strips look like and gauage it. 
    Linda McCarthy
    I have a roman blind which is 162cm finished and my fabric is 150cm wide. How do I balance the drops out so I have 2 on each side to make it look balanced? Do I make the middle 137cm but that still doesn't give me much on each side. Any ideas would be appreciated as I want it to look right.
    Jennifer Burns
    Hi , I am making blinds with blackout lining , I am not using rod pocket tape but making them out of the lining, before joining the fabric/lining together do I need to herringbone stitch the 2cm side margin on face fabric first? Would save a whole lot of hand sewing
    Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    I'm not really sure what you are asking. The tutorial is for a lined blind and we don't herringbone stitch. We only herringbone stitch on the interlined blind.
    lucy
    Hi, thanks for the instructions. I've watched this video a couple of times but just want to confirm: is the top not cut straight on the fabric either, like the lining? Thank you!
    Sew Helpful
    Thats right, The top is dealt with when you form the heading in later STEPs.
    Rayen
    I have a fabric with a large pattern which runs selvedge to selvedge and the grain is skewed. How do I cut a straight line when the longer length of the blind is not parallel with the selvedge? The blind is 98cm x 232cm.
    Sew Helpful
    This a common problem and you have to work with it and do your best. We have a blog item where we sometimes pull the corner of the fabric to try and move the pattern. It can sometimes spring back though so doesn't always work. The spring back is more of a risk on a blind.
    Linda
    I am making a blind 175cm wide and need to add two side panels to get the width and there is a vertical pattern, I have watched the joining a patterned fabric tutorial and the making up the face fabric videos several times. I am unclear whether I cut away 2cm of selvedge on each edge of fabric being joined or do I just cut into the selvedge and retain them in the seam. Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    It depends on how wide the selvedge is and how bulky the fabric is, Some fabrics have alot of selvedge others hardly any. Your join will be where the pattern meets then it is up to you to decide if you need to trim the excess. If you do trim leave approx 2.5cm each side .
    Nicky
    You say that you are in the process of writing instructions for making roman blinds with blackout lining. Do you know when they might be put online? Thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    It won't be until May, we are still finishing off work on our workshop website and blog. 

    http://www.dolman-taylor.co.uk/ 
    Sarah
    Really helpful instructions thank you; so glad I found you! I can't seem to get a right angle on my fabric, even though I've pulled threads in both directions to ensure I cut along the grain. In this instance, do I go with what the ruler says and cut it slightly on the bias, or stick with the weave? I'd be worried that it won't hang straight if it's off the grain slightly.
    Sew Helpful
    Manipulate the fabric as best you can but follow the ruler you need to get the blind square.
    Sarah
    Following on from the above, I see you've got a really good blog from 1st November 2016 which shows how to manipulate fabric where the pattern isn't in line with the grain. I'll be trying that; it might be useful for others. Have also purchased the video tutorials; they are excellent thank you.
    Daphne
    Hello,
    My first time at making a blind and your instructions are brilliantly detailed and helpful. I've just spotted an error in my work though and wonder if you could help. Lining and face all make, rod pockets sewn on and slip stitched sides. However I've just realised the hem at the bottom is very small, more or less the same size as the bottom bar and there is loads of spare fabric at the top. Is there any way around this or do I need to undo the slip stitch at the side and move the whole lining up along the face fabric?
    Thanks
    Daphne
    Sew Helpful
    Undo and remake.
    Daphne
    Thanks for getting back to me so quickly!
    Daphne
    Hello,
    My first time at making a blind and your instructions are brilliantly detailed and helpful. I've just spotted an error in my work though and wonder if you could help. Lining and face all make, rod pockets sewn on and slip stitched sides. However I've just realised the hem at the bottom is very small, more or less the same size as the bottom bar and there is loads of spare fabric at the top. Is there any way around this or do I need to undo the slip stitch at the side and move the whole lining up along the face fabric?
    Thanks
    Daphne
    Daphne
    Hello,
    My first time at making a blind and your instructions are brilliantly detailed and helpful. I've just spotted an error in my work though and wonder if you could help. Lining and face all make, rod pockets sewn on and slip stitched sides. However I've just realised the hem at the bottom is very small, more or less the same size as the bottom bar and there is loads of spare fabric at the top. Is there any way around this or do I need to undo the slip stitch at the side and move the whole lining up along the face fabric?
    Thanks
    Daphne

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