BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

Materials
  • - Fabric
  • - Lining
  • - Interlining
  • - Thread
  • - Velcro Loop Tape
  • - Cord
  • - Rods
  • - Bottom Bar
  • - Rings
  • Tools
  • - Sewing Machine
  • - Tape Measure
  • - Needles
  • - Scissors
  • - Set Square
  • - Straight Edge
  • - Invisible Marker
  • Options
  • - Wooden Batten
  • - Velcro Hook Tape
  • - Screw Eyes
  • - Acorn
  • - Cleat Hook
  • - Cord
  • - Staple Gun
  • or
  • - Headrail Kit
  • - Hacksaw
  • Step 2: Calculate the Blind Dimensions

    You now have the finished blind width and length. Next you need to calculate the number of folds in the roman blind as it is pulled up. The blind will have standard folds where the folds lie on top of each other when the blind is pulled up.

    STANDARD FOLDS CALCULATION

    First we need to establish the Headrail Allowance

    The headrail allowance must be sufficient to cover the batten face and allow enough room for the blind to pull up underneath the batten without it hitting the batten/eyelets before it is fully up (with all the folds hanging inline with each other).

    As a general rule use an absolute minimum headrail allowance of:

    Traditional batten: Batten face + 3.5cm
    Headrail mechanisim: Headrail depth + 2.5cm

    Please see our BLOG entry HEADRAIL ALLOWANCE EXPLAINED for more detail

    • Deduct the headrail allowance from the finished blind length to give the amount of fabric to be folded.
    • Decide on the approximate depth you would like the folds to be when the blind is pulled up*. Folds are usually 10cm to 25cm.
    • Divide the length of fabric to be folded by an odd number until you get an answer closest to your ideal depth of the folds.
    • The odd number that was closest is now your number of pleat sections and the answer in (3.) is now the depth of your folds.
    • The number of rod pockets = (number of pleat sections -1) divided by 2

    *Note the depth of the blind when pulled up will be equal to the headrail allowance plus the depth of the fold (one pleat section).

    Alternatively try our online calculator.

    Your Questions & Comments

    Ann Parry

    This is amazing thank you so very much.

    I have always been unsure how or should I say where to put my rod pockets but think I have finally got it luckily I came across this information, as I wanted the folds to cascade slightly, if I hadn’t seen this I would have not got that effect,I cannot thank you enough.

    Also I am making them for my daughter so she too would have been disappointed but would never have said to me.

    Once again thank you.

    Regards

    Ann Parry. Xx????

    Rosie

    I want my blinds to be outside the recess and be interlined. Is it best to have fewer folds if they are interlined? I'm just trying to work out how far above the window they will need to be positioned

    SewHelpful:

    Interlined blinds are thicker than lined, the more folds you have the more likely they are to push out when stacked at the top. Up to 3 or 4 rods ( 5 or 7 pleat sections) usually works fine, on long blinds we have done more.

    The thickness of your fabric and the thickness of the interlining is a factor. You will see in the videos we use a fine interlining.

    Caroline Warwood

    Hello I'm confused about the head rail allowance...do you not just measure the depth of the roman blind cassette attachment. I normally deduct 5cm. Is that right?

    SewHelpful:

    We add a lttle bit more than the depth of the cassette attachment (x 1.5) to allow for some room for the rings of the blind to pull up underneath when the blind is fully pulled up.

    The tutorial is also for a traditional wooden batten headrail with ring eyelets underneath. The extra room underneath is more important here as the rings only pull up to the eyelet not the bottom of the batten.

    Ann Whettingsteel

    am making a recessed roman blind with bobbles on the drop edge. Do i have to make the blind smaller so the bobbles just touch the windowsill.Also so the bobbles show when the blind is fully up do I have to put a dowel rod pocket nearer the bottom of blind.

    SewHelpful:

    Make the length of the blind the drop you measured in step 1 minus the size of the bobbles. Calculate your pocket and folds based on this shorter length. Then attach your bobbles to the bottom of the blind.

    The total blind length including bobbles should now be your measured drop. So the bobbles will just touch the sill when the blind is down. When the blind is pulled up, all the folds will be in line and the bobbles will just hang below at the front.

    The bottom of the blind has a bar in it already.

    Caroline

    I have made a roman blind where the drop is 208cm in length.

    I used the calculator and went with the pleat sections and rod pockets all being 40.6cm with two rod pockets in total. My question is when lowering the blind can it stop and sit at any point of the blind (half way down a fold)or should it sit only on the folds ?

    SewHelpful:

    You can lower a blind to where you like. 2 rod pockets for that length blind doesn't sound enough for a conventional looking blind.

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