How to make -
Interlined Roman Blind
Traditional Rod Pockets
BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

Materials
  • - Fabric
  • - Lining
  • - Interlining
  • - Thread
  • - Velcro Loop Tape
  • - Cord
  • - Rods
  • - Bottom Bar
  • - Rings
  • Tools
  • - Sewing Machine
  • - Tape Measure
  • - Needles
  • - Scissors
  • - Set Square
  • - Straight Edge
  • - Invisible Marker
  • Options
  • - Wooden Batten
  • - Velcro Hook Tape
  • - Screw Eyes
  • - Acorn
  • - Cleat Hook
  • - Cord
  • - Staple Gun
  • or
  • - Headrail Kit
  • - Hacksaw
  • Watch the videos for full step by step tution of the instructions and expert tips from the workshop

    Video User Comments

    I love your videos they have given me the confidence to make my own curtains and blinds....Julie

    Your videos are so good, thank you…..Alex

    Once again, I should say that I think the video tutorials are extremely well done. Although I've been sewing for years I've learnt lots of techniques that are new to me and that give a much more professional finish........Heather

    Thank you for such brilliant tutorials and videos....... ....Barbara

    I have absolutely loved your videos for curtain making, I have learnt so much from you….Charlotte

    Step 6: Make up the Face Fabric Panel & Insert Interlining

    If you are using more than one width, join the fabric with a plain seam or seams. Note a much better finish is achieved by joining fabric to either side of a full central panel, making sure the seams are the same distance from each edge so the panels are symmetrical and any pattern remains central.

    See our BASICS Tutorial - How to join plain fabric

    See our BASICS Tutorial - How to join patterned fabric

    PLAIN and PATTERNED FABRIC are treated differently at this stage

    PLAIN FABRIC

    • Cut the plain fabric to the length of the FABRIC CUT DROP calculated in step 3.

      ie: Cut Length = Finished Blind Length + 5cm Heading Allowance + 9cm Hem Allowance

    • Check the bottom of the panel is straight and at a true right angle, if not trim.
    • Cut the fabric panel to the FABRIC CUT WIDTH in Step 3 (finished blind width + 10cm).
    More Info >>
    EXTRA HELP VIDEOS
    Interlined Roman Blind Tutorial
    14 videos
    1hr 39min
    We'll show you
    • - How we make them in the workshop
    • - How to get a professional finish
    • - How to get your blind square
    • - Expert tips and techniques
    • - All the stitches with close ups
    • - How to avoid mistakes

    PATTERNED FABRIC

    First work out where you want the pattern to be on the finished blind.

    • Make sure the pattern is central on the blind
    • With a stripe it is important to have an equal amount of stripe on each side of the blind for it to look right.
    • Cut your fabric panel to the FABRIC CUT WIDTH in Step 3 (finished blind width + 10cm).
    • Remember to keep your pattern central in the correct postion by removing fabric from each side.
    • Find the point where you want the pattern to start at the top of the blind
    • Measure up from that "top of blind point" the heading allowance (5cm). This is the position to start measuring your cut drop from.
    • Now measure down the FABRIC CUT DROP calculated in step 3 and cut.
    • ie: Cut Length = Finished Blind Length + 5cm Heading Allowance + 9cm Hem Allowance

    • Check the bottom of the panel is straight and at a true right angle, if not trim.
    More Info >>
    EXTRA HELP VIDEOS
    Interlined Roman Blind Tutorial
    14 videos
    1hr 39min
    We'll show you
    • - How we make them in the workshop
    • - How to get a professional finish
    • - How to get your blind square
    • - Expert tips and techniques
    • - All the stitches with close ups
    • - How to avoid mistakes

    PLAIN and PATTERNED FABRIC are now treated the same.

    TURN IN SIDES & HEM

    • Place the fabric panel right side up and mark the 5cm side allowances with dashes of vanishing marker pen (or pins).
    • Turn the fabric over right side down and fold in the side allowances (finger press and pin).
    • Check the width is the finished width of the blind all the way up and the bottom is straight and at a true right angle.
    • Place the fabric panel right side up and mark the 9cm double hem allowance with two lines of dashes of vanishing marker pen (or pins). The first line 4cm up from the bottom and the second line a further 5 cm up.
    • Turn the fabric over and fold up the double hem twice along the two lines marked. Check the blind is square.
    • Mitre the corners of the blind fabric. (finger press and pin)
    More Info >>
    EXTRA HELP VIDEOS
    Interlined Roman Blind Tutorial
    14 videos
    1hr 39min
    We'll show you
    • - How we make them in the workshop
    • - How to get a professional finish
    • - How to get your blind square
    • - Expert tips and techniques
    • - All the stitches with close ups
    • - How to avoid mistakes

    JOIN INTERLINING PANELS (if required)

    CUT AND INSERT THE INTERLINING

    • Lay the fabric right side down.
    • Unpin and open out the face fabric panel.
    • Lay the interlining on top, smooth out and trim to the approximate size of the fabric panel (slightly bigger).
    • Cut the interlining so it is 4cm up from the bottom of the fabric. (inline with the first hem fold)
    • Trim the bulk of interlining away in the mitred corners.
    • Refold the hem and mitred corners and pin in place.
    • Fold the side turns back into place and pin. (make sure the interlining fold tucks right to the edge of the blind)
    • Trim away the excess interlining on the side turns.
    • Herringbone stitch the side turns to the interlining, stitching up to 2cm of where the top of the blind will be. (Beware DO NOT stitch through to the face fabric with all herringbone stitching)
    • Herringbone stitch the hem to the interlining. (take care not to stitch too deep into the hem and close the pouch that is formed for the bottom bar here)
    • Cut the bottom bar 2cm shorter than the width of the blind.
    • Insert the bottom bar into the hem pouch through the open mitres.
    • Ladder stitch closed the mitred corners.
    More Info >>
    EXTRA HELP VIDEOS
    Interlined Roman Blind Tutorial
    14 videos
    1hr 39min
    We'll show you
    • - How we make them in the workshop
    • - How to get a professional finish
    • - How to get your blind square
    • - Expert tips and techniques
    • - All the stitches with close ups
    • - How to avoid mistakes

    Extra Help & Comments

    Patricia Harrow
    If I interline my blinds, at which width will it be necessary to attach the interlining to the main fabric to prevent it ballooning? Could this be done by blind hem with machine?
    Thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    Hi Patricia

    The stab stitches applied  in step 8 will hold the interlining to the lining and fabric.
    Steve Rio
    how far apart should the stitches on the interlining be to ensure that the blind will be robust?
    Sew Helpful
    The distance between the crosses on our herringbone stitches are about 3cm.

     
    Jaye Rogers
    What interlining would you recommend? Concerned that I might buy something too thick that will cause the blind not to fold well. Thanks
    Sew Helpful
    We use a lightweight synthetic or cotton domett interlining. You are right in that you do not want it too thick. Always best to ask advice on suitability from the shop you are buying it from.
    Maddy Sharman
    How do I mitre corners? And here, am I just doing it with pins, rather than actually sewing?
    Sew Helpful
    Videos should be available in a couple of days.
    Ged
    By trimming the interlining down will this not be the same as the finished blind width, if so why not say the interlining should be same width as the lining
    Sew Helpful
    You are trimming the interling to fit inside the fabric panel, (which yes is the same width as the finished blind width). The Instructions say "trim to the approximate size of the fabric panel (slightly bigger)"

    At this stage you will have cut lining to the same width of the blind in STEP 5 but folded the sides in 2cm to make a lining panel 4cm narrower than the blind width. If we were to say  "interlining should be same width as the lining" as you suggest ,I think most people would probably cut it 4cm too narrow.
    wendy
    my blind is 212cm wide. Do I join the interlining either side like the face fabric to achieve the width or can I join in the centre as it wont be visible?
    Sew Helpful
    We would make the joins in the interlining in the same place as the fabric.

    However before that we would look to see if we can use the interlining sideways (railroad) so we don't need any joins at all. 
    Sylvia
    Trying to make a blind 250cm x 155cm. Having great trouble getting it all square. Don't have a large table cannot work on floor. Any suggestions please
    Sew Helpful
    Have you watched the videos? They will give you some tips and information on getting the fabric straight.
    Tina
    How wide is the bottom bar please and is it the first turn up (4cm) which is mitred or both turn ups
    Sew Helpful
    The bar we used is 25mm deep but some supplied with kits may be 20mm. The mitring of the corners is fully demonstrated in the videos.
    Tina
    I know how to mitre just wanted to know if it is the finished 5cm hem which is mitred or is it the 4cm hem which is mitred, thank you
    Brona
    Thank you for excellent tuition. Is it necessary to use blackout lining when using interlining or will standard lining plus interlining be sufficient to block out light? Same question for thermal lining.
    Sew Helpful
    Hi Brona

    You need to use blackout lining, interlining will not block the light out, see the interlined blind below.

     Blind

    We would not make an interlined blind with blackout lining on the back as we feel it is too bulky. We make our blackout blinds similar to the interlined blind incorporating blackout lining, or a combined blackout interliner inside the blind  (rather than interliner) with a lined back. as you need to take the blackout all the way to the edge. We will be making a blackout iined blind tutorial in the future.
    Amanda
    Thank you for your most helpful website. I am about to buy my fabric and will then access the tutorials. I would like to use blackout lining as an interliner and then ordinary lining. Should I just follow the tutorial for interlined blinds?
    Sew Helpful
    We are going to make a blackout lined tutorial. You can follow the interlined one and sandwich in blackout lining. We would cut the blackout 0.5cm narrower than the width of the blind though and probably use a combined blackout interliner rather than blackout if the fabric is a fine cotton or linen. The combined blackout/interliner will give the blind a little more bulk and be slightly easier to herringbone stitch in.
    Amanda
    I am using blackout lining instead of interlining (wasn't able to get combined). How do you sew the herringbone stitch without making holes in the blackout lining?
    Thank you.
    Sew Helpful
    Any stitch you make into the blckout will create a pinprick of light. We will be writing a blackout Roman Blind tutorial to show our techniques to reduce this problem.
    LadySewful
    I am making a 2.10m wide blind and finding it really hard to get it square. I have a big table that is 1.22m x 1.8m. Do you have any tips on how to get it square? Thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    Have you watched the videos, they are all in there.
    LadySewful
    I've watched them but your blind fits totally on the table. Mine is too large for the table. Which video are you specifically talking about that deals with big blinds? thanks so much by the way. Your videos are the best.
    Sew Helpful
    The videos show you tips on how to get it square when you don't have a squre table and a long enough Tbar. As we have a really big table we have always been able to lay out the width of any blinds we have made.

    Sometimes in the workshop we have to butt an extra table up alongside when we are working on really big curtains to get the table space. Otherwise there is always the floor, infact at the moment we are working on a pair of apex curtains so big we had to take the tables out of the workroom and lay the curtains on the floor to get the angles on the heading right.

    On the "Your Makes" page there is a 2.6m x 2.5m purple blind made by Heather, there is a little bit of info there on how she made it on a narrow table. (but I think it was long enough to take the width), the table is in the photos as well.

    curtain on floor



    LadySewful
    Thanks for all of that info. The biggest problem is that its a really thin silk tip e of atria and is moving around all over the place. i have remade it three times!!
    Andrea
    Can you suggest a good way of joining interlining please, standard machine hem, or o lay and herringbone?

    Thanks

    Tania Pearson
    How do I join the interlining? I'm using bump interlining that is 410gsm so it is quite thick. I'm worried that if I join it with the usual seam that it will bulk out the blind too much in that area. Could I cross stitch it together so that there isn't a doubling up of fabric?

    Or would you recommend getting a thinner interliner?
    Sew Helpful
    We wouldn't use bump (too heavy) we would use a sarille interlining in a blind.

    To avoid joins in interlining you can try and use it side ways if the drop of the blind isn't too much (railroading) 
    Tania Pearson
    Thank you, I thought you may say that. I'll order a sarille interlining. My blind is 180 cm wide, so the interlining would need joining for railroading - is this what you would do for that width blind, or would you join vertically?

    Great videos by the way! There's no way I could have made my lining and rod pockets so perfectly without them.

    Fiona
    Thank you for your wonderful instructions which have been very helpful indeed. I am making a Roman blind with both thermal interlining and black out lining and a regular light weight cotton lining on the back with sewn in rod pockets. Can you recommend which order to layer the fabrics to get the best finish and best folds considering there will be so many layers! Do I insert the black out lining between the face fabric and the interlining? I have used bonded lining/interlining before but found it a bit too stiff and heavy when the blind is being folded up, although I possibly didn't have enough stab stitches.
    Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    We would use bonded blackout lining in the middle rather than separate blackout and interliner.
    Fiona
    Thank you, I didn't know you can get bonded black out lining. Is this widely available? many thanks for your reply.
    Sew Helpful
    If you dont want to buy whole rolls, Merrick and Day sell it in cut lengths
    fiona
    Many thanks
    Karen
    Your site is absolutely brilliant! I've been hand making curtains and blinds for myself and friends for years and have still found so many useful tips and techniquest, thank you. I love your 5cm deep metre rule can you recommend a supplier?
    Sew Helpful
    You can buy them from builders merchants, Be careful though as most have a groove under the leading edge which means the fabric slightly moves when you draw a line as the ruler is not holding it in place on the leading edge, but slightly back from it.
    Alison
    Absolutely excellent videos and instructions - thank you! I'm making a silk blind interlined with sarille. Your instructions have both the face fabric as well as the interlining turned at the sides and bottom of the blind. Why is it not a good idea to cut the interlining to butt against side and bottom folds of the face fabric, so that you are only turning over the face fabric rather than face fabric AND the interlining? The herringboning and stab stitching would keep the interlining in place and the edges might be less bulky? Would love to know if this would be a good or a bad idea!
    Sew Helpful
    You can do it that way (its what we do with blackout in the workshop -that tutorial is in the pipeline). On the interlined blind we fold the edges to give them a bit more structure.
    Alison
    Perfect - thank you!
    Jenny
    Thank you so much for sharing your experience & for such a useful website. Thanks to your clear & detailed instructions and useful tips, I decided to make all the roman blinds for our new house. Your roman blind tutorial is great. Thank you!

    I'm now making my first blind with blackout lining - using the blackout as interlining. Are you able to give an idea of when the blackout tutorial will be available please?

    Meanwhile I'm working out how to fix the side turns of the face fabric to the blackout, prior to herringbone stitching - and how to herringbone stitch without piercing the blackout. I'm thinking of wondaweb to attach the sides in place - and, for the herringbone stitching, of placing the blackout right side up, so the textured side is uppermost, catching it really carefully so I don't pierce through the blackout. I'd appreciate any advice you can give on this please. Thanks.
    Sew Helpful
    Black out tutorial realistically online in 2 months.

    You have to pierce the blackout in places making a roman blind, If you cant accept that then a roller blind may be a better option. We don't use wondaweb, we do often use combined blackout interlining to help reduce pinpricks if it is not going to make the blind too thick with the face fabric. 
    Jenny
    Many thanks, that's helpful.
    Jenny
    Many thanks, that's helpful.
    Linda
    Could I please ask what technique you use to ensure the sides of the blind panel are square one you have added side panels to the width? I have carefully followed the techniques fir pattern matching on the seams as demonstrated by the basic technique tutorial and have achieved really good pattern matched seams. Will the odd mm difference that the seating might produce affect the squareness of my finished blind?

    Many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    We make the joins, then trim it square.

    The tutorial videos show techniques for getting it square, For really large blinds you need a large square table, long rulers and set squares for the best results.
    Mandy Sheehan
    Bought Roman black out blinds but backing is blackout and in cream front of the blind is grey is there away to add the grey or a dark fabric to the back
    Sew Helpful
    Sorry no idea.

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