How to make -
Interlined Roman Blind
WORKROOM METHOD
BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

Materials
  • - Fabric
  • - Lining
  • - Interlining
  • - Thread
  • - Velcro Loop Tape
  • - Buckram (optional)
  • - Rods
  • - Bottom Bar
  • - Rings or Breakouts
  • Tools
  • - Sewing Machine
  • - Tape Measure
  • - Needles
  • - Scissors
  • - Set Square
  • - Straight Edge
  • - Invisible Marker
  • Headrail
  • - Wooden Batten
  • - Velcro Hook Tape
  • - Screw Eyes
  • - Acorn
  • - Cleat Hook
  • - Cord
  • - Staple Gun
  • or
  • - Headrail Kit
  • - Hacksaw
  • Step 5: Make up the Lining

    CUT THE LINING

    1. Cut the lining to the LINING CUT WIDTH (finished width of blind)
    2. Check the 2 sides are cut straight and parallel
    3. Cut the bottom of the lining exactly square (6cm trimming allowance in Lining QTY for this)

    TURN IN SIDES & HEM

    • With the lining facing wrong side up fold each side in 2cm and press.
    • Fold the bottom of the lining up 2cm and press.
    • Mitre the lining in the 2 bottom corners and press.

    MAKE THE ROD POCKETS

    If you are using rod pocket tape please go the ROD POCKET tape instructions (bottom of page)

    MEASURE & SEW IN

    • Lay the lining panel right side facing up.
    • Measure up from the bottom of the lining panel the first rod pocket position on the "Blind" minus 2cm. Note the lining will be attached 2cm above the bottom of the blind, hence the need to measure minus 2cm.
    • With a straight edge mark a horizontal line between the rod pocket marks on each side of the lining. (measure this line at intervals across the blind and make sure it is square with the edge of the lining.)
    • On each side measure up the rod pocket allowance from the rod pocket line and again mark a second line across
    • You now have the first rod pocket marked ready for sewing.
    • Turn the lining over and pin the two horizontal rod pocket lines together so the wrong sides touch together. Then machine down the touching lines to form the rod pocket. After stitching press the pocket and check it is at a right angle to the side of the lining.
    • Measure up each side again from the bottom of the lining to the next rod pocket and repeat the process until all the rod pockets are sewn in.
    • Remember to allow for the 2cm at the bottom, eg if the rod pockets on the blind were at 12cm from the bottom of the blind, 36cm and 60cm. you would measure the rod pockets 10cm, 34cm and 58cm from the bottom of the lining panel.
    • ** Note it is important to mark and sew in each rod pocket one at a time and measure from the BOTTOM of the LINING panel to prevent compound errors.

    Included in this video
    • How to mark & pin the first rod pocket.
    Included in this video
    • How to machine stitch the first rod pocket.
    • How to mark and make the other rod pockets.

      EXTRA INSTRUCTIONS

    • Check you have enough tape for the number of rod pockets you intend to make.
    • Lay the lining panel right side facing up.
    • Measure up and mark from the bottom of the lining panel the "lining" rod pocket positions calculated in STEP 2 (blind rod pocket positions -2cm). Note the lining will be attached 2cm above the bottom of the blind, hence the positions on the lining are 2cm less than those on the blind.
    • With a straight edge mark a horizontal line between the rod pocket marks on each side of the lining. (make sure it is square with the edge of the lining.)
    • Cut the roman blind tape to the width of the blind. (lining width plus 4cm)
    • Lay the top of the tape along the line, fabric loops facing up, plain side down. Note some tapes may be sew along the bottom (tape above the line) rather than sew along the top (tape below the line) in the example we show. Check your instructions.
    • Fold 2cm of tape under to close the end and machine stitch the top of the tape to the lining along each marked line stopping 2.5cm before the other side.
    • Tip: tacking the tape on first may help you when sewing it on if you are a beginner (see video).

    FAQs

    Yes it does matter, we would throw it away and start again in the workroom. Cutting a lining panel with straight parallel sides and a straight square bottom, is crucial for making a well made roman blind. If you don't get this bit right you will find ..........

    We never use tape in the workroom, as we believe pockets made from the lining and sewn on brass rings give a far more professional finish. We also think it is easier to neatly sew a rod pocket than sew the tape on.

    On the plus side for tape, it does reduce the work later as you can use the tape fabric loops rather than sew rings on to guide the cords and clip safety breakouts on rather than sew them on.

    Of course if you have a kit where the safety breakouts are clipped on you will have to use the tape provided.

    Your Questions & Comments

    Kerry

    I love these tutorials, the fog has lifted! The only question I have is that I want to make an interlined blackout blind. To minimise the light ingress would it work if I were to make the rod pockets in the interlining, then just use minimal stab stitches to attach the rings and secure all three layers together. Your advise would be greatly appreciated.

    Keep well in all the current madness.

    Thank you :D

    SewHelpful:

    We wouldn't do that.

    To minimise light we would make a blackout blind with combined blackout interlining. Sometimes called bonded blackout interlining.

    Charlotte

    Hi there,

    I have bought a kit that comes with rod tape. Could you please advise me where I stitch the rod tape onto the lining... ie. does the rod itself sit on the marked out measured line or does the machined line of stitches which is above the rod pocket sit directly over the marked out line? I hope you can tell what I mean by that!

    Having said that I am tempted to leave sewing the rod tape on at all and then at the very end iron it on with hemming sticky tape. Is that a bad idea??!

    Many thanks, Charlotte

    SewHelpful:

    I'm afraid we can't advise on different designs of rod tape. Generally it is attached with a single stitch line that is the point the blind fold pulls up on. 


    We wouldn't say sticking the tape on  is a bad idea, we would say it is a TERRIBLE idea. The weight of the blind when pulled up is pulled on the these pocket/tape stitch lines. If you stick it there will not be a stitch single line where the fold pulls up on (it will pull up over the width of the tape) which will probably mean the folds don't form well and I don't think it will stay stuck on  very long.


    Ca

    You don't mention sewing the lining hem. Do I assume that this doesn't need to be done?

    SewHelpful:

    That's correct as per the instructions you just fold and press.

    Helen

    Hi, firstly thank you so much for the in-depth instructions. Thought I should just point out a bit of a boo boo. The first couple of blinds I made, I used the lined instructions which give a 9cm hem on the lining. Clearly says measure up the fold depth plus the 9cm hem allowance which worked a treat. However on the interlined instructions it tells you to measure from the bottom of the lining panel minus 2cm to take into account the 2cm gap allowance between the bottom of the blind and the bottom of the lining. Unfortunately, once you have given the lining a 2cm hem you have to place the hemmed lining 4cm up from the bottom of the blind to achieve your fold depth. The image clearly shows the bottom of the lining panel where you measure from not from the hem line. The instructions essentially need to be altered to not include deducting the 2cm, the two cm gap between the bottom of the finished blind and the bottom of the lining Is achieved when you hem the lining.

    SewHelpful:

    Hi Helen

    You had us scratching our heads as to where you were getting 4cm from and thinking the instructions are wrong. Then we realised that you have probably unfolded the 2cm pressed under at the bottom of the lining panel (similar to the lined method)

    The instructions in this tutorial do not tell you to unfold the 2cm side turns or 2cm bottom hem. You leave them pressed under and measure from the bottom of the lining panel that you have made up to that point (with the folds pressed under)

    The diagram shows where the bottom of the blind will be in red, the black line 2cm up is where the bottom of the folded under lining panel will be, the light dashed lines are indicating where the lining edge is that is folded behind (note the bottom line does not go all the way across). I think this is where the confusion has come from, I will see if I can annotate the diagram a bit better.

    In the videos all this is explained in detail and we show the folded under lining on the back of the panel before measuring, where you measure from and how to measure it out. 

    I hope that makes it a bit clearer for everybody. 

    Heather Farley

    HI,

    I am pinning my lining to join widths and Im wondering whether you would recommend putting a seam to both sides as you do with the patterned fabric or just joining the lining down the middle?

    Just thought Id ask before I start sewing.

    Thanks

    Heather

    SewHelpful:

    We join each side like the fabric.

    Hilary

    How wide should the rod pockets be please? Are they measured with the rod pocket marking as the centre of the rod pocket?

    SewHelpful:

    You would have decided the rod pocket allowance in the previous STEP when calculating the amount of lining required.

    The guidance given is " The rod pocket allowance is the circumference of the rod plus 1cm - our rods require a 2.5cm allowance."

    The marking out of the rod pockets is as in the diagram. 

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