How to make -
Interlined Roman Blind
Traditional Rod Pockets
BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

BLIND SAFETY
Blind Safety

This website is viewed globally and at the last time of looking had been used by people from 136 different countries.

The instructions and videos on this website show you the traditional methods of making a roman blind. Many countries have introduced safety regulations with respect to child safety, to reduce the threat of injury or strangulation to young children from the cords of roman blinds.

It is your responsibilty to find out what the regulations are for your country and modify these instructions to make your blind compliant with those regulations

Examples of safety advice and rules used by some countries of the world are:

  • Do not place furniture or beds near windows where children can climb up and access the blind cords.
  • For roman blinds with rod pockets greater than 20cms apart at any point a breakaway device must be used on each cord.
  • The cleat must be 150cms from the floor and accumulate all/most of the cord – only a single cord of no more than 20cms can hang below the cleat.
  • The bottom loop of the chain or cord must be 150cms from the floor and secured with a safety device OR If the operating chain/cord has a breakaway device then the bottom loop of the cord/chain can be 60cms from the floor.
  • Some countries require that all the blind's components have been tested and certified when used together.

Materials
  • - Fabric
  • - Lining
  • - Interlining
  • - Thread
  • - Velcro Loop Tape
  • - Cord
  • - Rods
  • - Bottom Bar
  • - Rings
  • Tools
  • - Sewing Machine
  • - Tape Measure
  • - Needles
  • - Scissors
  • - Set Square
  • - Straight Edge
  • - Invisible Marker
  • Options
  • - Wooden Batten
  • - Velcro Hook Tape
  • - Screw Eyes
  • - Acorn
  • - Cleat Hook
  • - Cord
  • - Staple Gun
  • or
  • - Headrail Kit
  • - Hacksaw
  • Step 1: Measure the Window

    First decide whether you want the blind to hang inside or outside the recess.

    INSIDE THE RECESS

    Measure FINISHED BLIND LENGTH:

    • Measure the drop from the top of the recess to the window sill in 3 places (each side and the middle). Take the shortest measurement as your finished blind length.

    Measure FINISHED BLIND WIDTH:

    • Measure the width of the window recess in 3 places and use the shortest width as your measurement. This will give you the finished blind width.

    OUTSIDE THE RECESS

    Measure FINISHED BLIND LENGTH:

    • Decide where the batten that will support the blind will be fixed above the window recess. Mark the position of the top of the batten and measure down to the sill. This will give you the finished blind length.

    Measure FINISHED BLIND WIDTH:

    There are 3 options for the finished width of the blind outside the recess.

    • If the window has an architrave surround measure the width of the architrave at its widest point.
    • If there is a window sill measure the width of the window sill.
    • If there is no architrave meaure the width of the opening at its widest point. Add 12cm to give the finished blind a 6cm overlap each side.

    Choose one of these 3 options and measure to get your finished blind width.

    Extra Help & Comments

    Liz
    Hi....we have just moved and I have inherited a house full of festoon blinds. Lovely that we already have window dressings and the fittings are already there so I can start to replace with updated Roman blinds.

    One of the windows in the loft has a huge and very heavy festoon blind - over 2m wide. There is just one batten currently. If I replace with 3 roman blinds in a row, can they hang from the same batten or do I need to break it up onto 3 battens?
    Many thanks..I'm looking forward to the challenge and your tutorials look amazingly detailed.
    Liz
    Sew Helpful
    Yes the blinds can hang from the same batten alongside each other.
    Jen
    I would like to hang roman blinds outside a window recess on a sloping wall - is there a way of securing the blind when down so that it hangs parallel to the wall rather than vertical?
    Sew Helpful
    We have made them before running the rings down wires held parallel to the sloping wall. This solution wouldn't be compliant with recent uk child safety regulations so we would now look to fit velux blinds designed to fit in the recess. 
    Tina
    I have bought combined interlining and lining although it is not very heavy - which instructions should I follow please the lined blind or the interlined blind
    Sew Helpful
    Your best bet is to follow the lined blind tutorial and use rod pocket tape.
    Jayne
    Hi, how do I factor in for a bead trim at the bottom of a blind please ? Say if my finished blind was 40cm would I make the blind at 39cm so that the trim would "line up" to 40cm or would I still make at 40cm (sorry hard to type how I ask you but hope you understand what I mean !) Thank you. Also, have you any plans to show how to attach beads / trims if you want to incorporate within the seam allowance ?
    Sew Helpful
    We would make the blind so the bead trim hangs below the line of the folds when the blind is pulled up.

    So take your finished blind length including bead trim that you have decided on Eg 80cm. Then subtract the drop of your bead trim eg 2cm. This will give you a blind length of 78cm. We would make the blind to this 78cm drop then add the 2cm bead trim to the bottom.

    That way when the blind is down it will be the 80cm length required. When it is up all the folds will be in line and the bead trim will hang down just below the bottom of the folds.

    Presently we are working on getting all the base tutorials online and do not have attaching bead trim in the plan. (maybe in the future)
    Maxine
    Hi, I need to line a lightweight cotton fabric to make a black out roman blind for a nursery room. Should I be looking for an iron on fabric or will I be able to stitch on a black-out lining material to my cotton fabric? I will need to securely fit the dowel etc to make the roller blind work smoothly.
    Sew Helpful
    I'm not sure if you are talking about a Roman blind or roller blind as you mention both. We do not make roller blinds and don't use iron on fabrics. The lined Roman blind instructions on this website have some information in the extra help sections where people have been making blackout Roman blinds.
    wendy
    I want to make roman blinds for a large bay window using 3 blinds and cassettes. How do I measure to allow cassettes to sit next to each other but not have window showing? Is there a general rule/technique? Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    We would cut and fit the cassettes first then measure. As a guide we would leave 1 to 2cm between the cassette ends at the corners to give a little room between the blinds so the don't rub when you pull them up. The gap is dependent on the thickness of the fabric if interlined etc, how many folds there are etc.
    caroline
    Hi, I'm making a roman blind for a recessed window and I've been told to calculate the width of the recess minus 1cm for the finished size. Is this correct or can I just go with the narrowest measurement within the recess ? I'm worried about leaving a gap around the edges. Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    We go with the narrowest measurement when we make as you tend to loose about 0.5cm on the side turns when making the blind.. But it is up to you.
    Caroline
    Thank you so much I've just finished my blind with the help of your fantastic tutorials and its great! one thing though I would like to make the next ones (I have 4 more to make) more blackout would you advise using a blackout lining and is this okay to make rod pockets on? Thank you
    Sew Helpful
    We will be making a blackout lined roman blind tutorial shortly. There are several ways to make the blind using blackout. The key thing is though you want the blackout to go to the edge of the blind (the cotton lining doesn't on a standard lined blind).

    We have posted some pictures  that give some information on how to get the blackout lining to the edge in the Question & Comments section of STEP 6 of our Lined Roman Blind Tutorial http://www.sew-helpful.com/roman-blind-lined-step6.php

    As you will see we do not make the rod pocket from the lining and use a pocket tape. There is a second method we use in the workshop that involves sandwiching a layer of blackout between a cotton lining and the fabric. This has the benfit of the rod pocket stitch lines not pin pricking through the blackout and with this method we tend to make the rod pockets from the linging as we think it looks better.

    We have plans to give full details of both methods, but they are not fully written yet.
    Caroline
    Can you tell me where you get your blackout fabric from that you use instead of interlining. Alternitively do you think I can use a blackout lining as the interling and then the normal cotton lining for the lining. I'm not sure as the blackout lining I have is smooth not "fluffy' and soft like interlining. Many thanks Caroline
    Sew Helpful
    We buy it wholesale in 40m rolls. We use a combined blackout interlining for our blackout blinds where we sandwich the blackout inside and normal blackout lining in the method shown in the images of the comments section of STEP6 line roman blind tutorial. 

    You could use normal blackout in the sandwich but we haven't tried it. I'm afraid it is going to be a while before we have written the instructions for our method.
    Betty
    I have read all instruction and would also like to view the video's
    but can not get them up. what am I doing wrong?
    Sew Helpful
    What happens when you click on them? Do you get a payment screen?
    Jenny
    Can you tell me if you can turn the fabric instead of joining widths of plain fabric for roman blinds.
    Somebody told me you can but I always thought there would be a weave issue.
    Sew Helpful
    We have done it many times on blinds and never had a probem with the weave on the fabrics we have used. Obviously we can't say how your fabric will hang. 

    Remember you can only use the the fabric sideways (railroaded) up to a certain length blind as you are restricted by the width of the fabric.
    Wendy
    I am making a blind for a window with an architrave. Its width, to the outer edge of the architrave is 2cm wider at the top than the bottom. Do I make the blind to its widest point?
    Sew Helpful
    For a blind outside the recess we would make it to the widest width of the architrave.
    Louise
    I have purchased combined lining interlining and now am not sure if it's possible to make rod pockets or if it will be too thick. Should I use rod pocket tape instead? I hadn't planned on this as I didn't think it would look as professional as sewing in the rod pockets
    Jane Stringer
    How do I decide how many vertical cords to put on? Obviously, ID have two on each end, but what width of blind would you need more. Thanks
    Sew Helpful
    It's hidden and  explained in step 8, we are rewriting the instructions, `i'll try and make it a bit more obvious.
    Fiona
    Hello, thank you for this fantastic tutorial. I have figured out measurements and bought main fabric and lining. The main fabric is light to medium weight. I am planning to interline the blind using a fairly lightweight combined thermal+blackout lining fabric. The finished dimensions of the blind are 230 cm drop x 190 cm width so quite big. Do you think interlining is the best method here or would you recommend the lined method instead? Thank you.
    Sew Helpful
    It depends on what look and feel you are going for.

    Interlined blinds are softer and a bit bulkier and help stop the draughts, Lined blinds can be lighter and crisper.
    Denise
    What width and depth piece of wood should I fit for the batten.

    Sorry for the typing error.
    Sew Helpful
    In the videos we use 18mm by 34mm wooden batten.
    Jules
    I am making a Roman blind finished width 135cms. The fabric is 138 cms wide. Would you add a small strip of fabric on one side or join a width either side of blind.
    Sew Helpful
    We never join on one side. In the workshop we would add a strip of fabric to each side. We would  also give the customer the option of not using the full width of the fabric and having a complimentary plain 10cm fabric border down each side.
    jennifer
    How would you suggest using bonded inter-lining?
    I was planning to make rod pockets from normal lining and stitch them to the back of the interlining and then make double side and base hems and invisibly hem them to the interlining.
    Would that work?
    This is a brilliant site by the way!
    Sew Helpful
    We are working on a blackout lined and bonded interlined tutorial based along these lines, but unfortunately it will be a little while before it is online. 
    Tania
    Help! I've made my blind lining to stop at the window sill and I've subsequently cut the face fabric with that in mind. However, some other sites recommend dropping the blind lower than the recess by about 5cm. Why do you recommend stopping at the window sill? Have I done the right thing?
    Sew Helpful
    You can make the blind lower than the sill when outside the recess if you wish. Many sills protrude out from the wall though so the blind may hit the sill coming down if the rail/batten doesn't hold it away from the wall enough.
    Tania
    Thank you. My headrail protrudes 3.6 cm and my sill only 2.5 cm - so I think it will look off if I don't make it longer. Would you agree? I'm about to unstitch my rod pockets and make the blind longer.
    Sew Helpful
    These are design decisions, without seeing the window and the room we cant really say what we think will look best. You just have to make a decision and go with it.
    Tania
    I'm interested why you don't recommend having a 5 cm overlap at the bottom of non-recessed blinds. Why do you recommend that you measure the finished length down to the sill? Thank you.
    Sew Helpful
    The tutorial was based on a window with a protruding sill so the blind will not travel past it without knocking it. A non recessed blind on a window that has a sill that does not stick out, then taking the blind 5cm below the sill line will look fine.

    I will add some extra info to the instructions 
    Caroline
    I have made a roman blind where the drop is 208cm in length.
    I used the calculator and went with the pleat sections and rod pockets all being 40.6cm with two rod pockets in total. My question is when lowering the blind can it stop and sit at any point of the blind (half way down a fold)or should it sit only on the folds ?
    many thanks
    Sew Helpful
    You can lower a blind to where you like. 2 rod pockets for that length blind doesn't sound enough for a convetional looking blind.
    Pauline
    I am considering interlining my blinds however I didnt know whether to use the Bonded twill lining & Interlining. Have you used this or would it be too stiff for each fold?
    Sew Helpful
    We have written a blog article about interlinings in our blog  

    https://www.sew-helpful.com/blog32-guide-to-interlining.php

    We almost always use sarille in roman blinds.

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